Seven 9s and 10s

steelopus:

The Ampex ATR 102 in action.
We mixed down to 1/2” tape and will send those reels off for mastering in February.

I really want to go back.
Something inside of me changes whenever I’m in a studio or while I’m actively involved with making a record. There’s a spark and an inherent sense that I should be spending all of my time there, creating. It’s hard to find the spark once I’m gone.

steelopus:

The Ampex ATR 102 in action.

We mixed down to 1/2” tape and will send those reels off for mastering in February.

I really want to go back.

Something inside of me changes whenever I’m in a studio or while I’m actively involved with making a record. There’s a spark and an inherent sense that I should be spending all of my time there, creating. It’s hard to find the spark once I’m gone.

High-res radiochantier:

Steve Albini

I’m no fanboy, and I’m not exactly a big fan of the music he’s made, but I can’t deny that I was pretty starstruck to be sitting on a couch next to Steve Albini for a few nights.
I mean… fuck… this is the dude that recorded In Utero. That album was a huge influence on me. Not to mention the countless other albums he’s touched that I’ve heard. He’s an icon. And I hung out with him for a few nights. And he said our stuff “sounds pretty good.” Yes. That’s right. He went out at 4am to get himself some Thai food. He came back. We were listening to Victory! in the studio lounge. He heard it. He asked if it was the new record. He said it “sounds pretty good.”
Shit. I don’t even care if he was just trying to be nice (I don’t get the feeling that’s the kind of guy he is… if he didn’t like it, he probably would’ve just kept his mouth shut and not even asked).Anyway. It was totally fucking surreal. And it’s kind of a shame that it’s how I started 2011, because I’m not sure anything I do for the rest of this year will live up to the excitement of spending those first few days in the studio of my dreams working on the music I’ve poured my heart and soul into for the last few years.

radiochantier:

Steve Albini

I’m no fanboy, and I’m not exactly a big fan of the music he’s made, but I can’t deny that I was pretty starstruck to be sitting on a couch next to Steve Albini for a few nights.

I mean… fuck… this is the dude that recorded In Utero. That album was a huge influence on me. Not to mention the countless other albums he’s touched that I’ve heard. He’s an icon. And I hung out with him for a few nights. And he said our stuff “sounds pretty good.” Yes. That’s right. He went out at 4am to get himself some Thai food. He came back. We were listening to Victory! in the studio lounge. He heard it. He asked if it was the new record. He said it “sounds pretty good.”

Shit. I don’t even care if he was just trying to be nice (I don’t get the feeling that’s the kind of guy he is… if he didn’t like it, he probably would’ve just kept his mouth shut and not even asked).

Anyway. It was totally fucking surreal. And it’s kind of a shame that it’s how I started 2011, because I’m not sure anything I do for the rest of this year will live up to the excitement of spending those first few days in the studio of my dreams working on the music I’ve poured my heart and soul into for the last few years.

(via bucketbd)

High-res A Portrait Of The Dick Who Fucked Up Our Record (via steelopus)
The fridge at Electrical Audio was plastered with interesting stuff (including a hand written thank you note from Fugazi to the studio), but this was by far the best piece.
It’s full of mostly inside jokes that Steve Albini fans will find hilarious.  Click-through to see the large version.

A Portrait Of The Dick Who Fucked Up Our Record (via steelopus)

The fridge at Electrical Audio was plastered with interesting stuff (including a hand written thank you note from Fugazi to the studio), but this was by far the best piece.

It’s full of mostly inside jokes that Steve Albini fans will find hilarious.  Click-through to see the large version.